Keep that Jargon Away

By Vanessa Denha Garmo with Ashourina Slewo

I was sitting a meeting with clients and commented about a social media post being a teaser? Then I said something about B-roll. I quickly realized I was using media jargon that seemed foreign to my clients.

Sitting among professionals like yourself, you may use jargon and not think twice about it and that’s okay. You are all in the same or similar profession, jargon is just another facet of your vocabulary. Keep it in that clique, though, because it has no place in your content!

There could be a number of reasons people choose to use jargon in their content. Whether it’s the shorter way of saying something or if it’s to come across as knowledgeable. Regardless of the reason, just stop. Jargon overcomplicates your content and will ultimately take away from the message you are trying to convey. Of course, there are times you need to use it and if you do with people who don’t, start explaining.

Jargon is not here to impress

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When A Communication Problem Takes The Cake for A Costly Mistake!

Strategically Speaking: A Blog by Denha Media Group

My husband, daughter and I went to a very popular Michigan-based supermarket to pick up her birthday cake. When we arrived to the bakery, the woman behind the counter handed us over two half sheet cakes almost identical.

“What’s this?” I asked. “I didn’t order two cakes.”Happy Birthday Cake2

“I think one was butter cream and one was frosting; we weren’t sure what you wanted?”

“Why didn’t you call me? Two different women called me yesterday to ask me the same question. Why wouldn’t you call me to ask about the frosting? I did say I wanted butter cream.”

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Do You Have Netiquette?

Strategically Speaking: A Blog by Denha Media Group

Email etiquette is vital in maintaining respect, decorum and relationships

A few years ago, I got into a very heated argument via email. After days of arguing with this particular person and more than two dozen emails later, I realized the dispute had escalated far beyond the original disagreement and all because we were communicating via email.

Everyone knows the 24 hour rule. If someone or something has really upset you, wait at least 24 hours to respond. Waiting to respond to an email that infuriates you is also good advice. You may not have to wait 24 hours but don’t be too quick to hit the send button, either.

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Just Apologize and Avoid Running Into A Communication Crisis

Strategically Speaking: A Blog by Denha Media Group

I have come to the realization that we live in an extremely forgiving society, if you would just admit your mistakes and apologize.

So why do so many people struggle with the “I’m sorry?”

Public figures — especially — need to understand the basics of crisis communication. When you make a mistake, you need to apologize, fix it and move on.

Here we have two elected officials who have found themselves in the proverbial “hot water” because of bad judgments and bad behavior. One apologizes and the other does not.

Following President Obama’s State of the Union address, in a Capitol office, a New York reporter was interviewing Congressman Michael Grimm. Apparently, the New York Republican became very angry when asked about an investigation into his 2010 campaign fundraising activities, so he threatened to throw the reporter, Michael Scotto, off a balcony.

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7 Ways To Turnaround That Tarnished Image

Strategically Speaking: A Blog by Denha Media Group

Many celebrities have bounced back from tarnished images and Mel Gibson, I would guess, hopes to be one of them — if he can just manage to get his communication under control.

Many actors have been linked to audio or video scandals, but Gibson seems to have taken it to whole new level. His vicious rants on tape depict an angry and perhaps troubled man. Gibson appears to be an equal opportunity offender in his voicemail message to his girlfriend Oksana — he managed to offend just about every race, origin, and religion in a few sentences.  America’ s obsession with celebrities enables the household names to rebound quicker than someone who was thrust into the media due to a scandal, such as Monica Lewinsky. Her fifteen minutes of fame following her presidential indiscretions didn’t allow much time to repent and re-brand her public image, despite her many appearances in the media, including on The View where she was pedaling her purse line.

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